Author : Nick Krym

Pros and Cons of Outsourcing QA

I saw a question on LinkedIn early this morning on a topic I was planning to cover “Pros and Cons of QA Outsourcing” – I jumped to the answer and typed up an answer while on BART, ironically it turned out to be too big for LinkedIn and so I decided to put it here. The answer is not complete and I am planning to come back to it some time. In meanwhile here are my thoughts:

1) Outsourcing QA is often a meaningful thing to do, an easy way to start and a potentially very dangerous trap. In particular companies that shed internal QA resources and move their QA operation abroad typically pay the price in knowledge loss and ultimately in degradation of the product quality. I have seen it on numerous occasions. QA engineers in well run teams often have better product knowledge than any other part of the organization, and offshoring that knowledge falls in a category of “outsourcing crown jewels”.

2) Companies in US often consider outsourcing QA for all wrong reasons, like for example “Cost”.  Cost advantage is just a myth, see my earlier post for details Outsourcing Myths: cost advantage. And going offshore for wrong reasons is guaranteed to give your wrong results.

3) QA as a subset of IT field offers a few interesting dynamics

a. It’s one of the most important areas of SDLC which typically is given the least attention.

b. The average quality of talent pool is dreadful, independently of geography. There are many reasons for that, for example here in SF Bay Area one of the main reasons is huge pollution of the pool by fraud and mediocrity – I met 100s of people who fake their QA background or think that a couple months of homegrown education makes them top notch professionals.

c. A perception of QA skills/occupation as a substandard one. It takes as much IQ to become a solid QA engineer as a Java developer, maybe more, but what can you do about perception? As one the best QA guys I’ve eve met put it talking about his resume “going to QA is like going to morgue – there is no way back”. And why don’t developers enjoy testing? Because it’s hard, it takes serious effort to put together a decent test harness, to organize your code, etc. Yet look at the average salaries, at layoff patterns, offshore dynamics – the trends are obvious.

4) Good QA engineers, automation specialists, functional testers, etc. like any other good resources are not easy to find, considering the quality of the pool, much harder. So it’s no surprise that that many organizations after interviewing a couple dozens of key-punchers who can’t tell the difference between priority and severity and ask for $90K move to offshore. The problem with such decision is obvious – it is as difficult to find good testers in Bangalore, Kiev or Beijing as it is in Boston. Of course a large supply of IT talent in countries like India and China makes it so much easier, yet the vendors in these countries have a plenty of own issues and challenges. Outsourcing the problem will not eliminate the problem, it only passes it to a different organization which is hopefully is better equipped to deal with it… But is it? Is your perspective vendor better equipped to do your job? How do you know it? By their brochures? Having interviewed hundreds of engineers in Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America I can tell you with certainty – far not ever vendor is equipped to do so, many of them are squarely in a business of selling mediocrity in bulk, and the quality of the resources is far less impressive comparing to what you can extrapolate based on what you see locally.

5) Having said all that I have to state that I still outsource a lot of my development and QA activities and get great results from my partners. There are a few ingredients to that success story, here are the most important:

a. Rigorous vendor selection process with the focus on “the match” between my organization and vendors’. Search for the match on multiple dimensions.

b. Resource augmentation and joined teams rather than complete outsourcing.

c. Abundant communications in all forms with fair portion of face-to-face meetings and on-site / offshore swaps

d. Control and ongoing preventive maintenance in all aspects of the engagement.

e. Adjusting SDLC to accommodate for idiosyncrasies introduced by offshore.

f. A “disposal outsourcing” model that I worked out with my one my partners – augmentsoft panned out quite well in QA arena.

g. Working with nearshore partners was much easier in many aspects especially when running agile projects.

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